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Statement on Diversity and Inclusion

ACHE of Massachusetts embraces diversity within the healthcare management field and recognizes that priority as both an ethical and business imperative. ACHE of Massachusetts values diversity and initiatives that promote diversity because they can improve the quality of the organization’s workforce. ACHE of Massachusetts also values and actively promotes diversity in its leaders and members because diverse participation can serve as a catalyst for improved decision making, increased productivity, and a competitive advantage.

Further, ACHE of Massachusetts works to foster an inclusive environment that recognizes the contributions and supports the advancement of all, regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, religion, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability because an inclusive environment accurately represents the populations we serve, can enhance the quality of healthcare, improve hospital/community relations, and positively affect the health status of society. This priority is reflected in the chapters various activities and initiatives.

ACHE of Massachusetts is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion through the following activities:

Within the Chapter organization:

  • The Chapter Nominating Committee is charged with assuring that the chapter board of directors is broadly representative of the chapter membership and with maintaining a diverse and inclusive chapter leadership.

Within the healthcare management field:

  • Strive to conduct at least one chapter educational event per year involving the topic of diversity and inclusion
  • Feature the topic of diversity and inclusion each year in Chapter communications, either a Chapter Newsletter or other e-mail communication
  • Develop a relationship within minority healthcare associations locally.

Diversity and Inclusion Committee

Chair: Carmen Kenrich

Scott Ariel
Executive Director 
Hebrew Rehabilitation Center at NewBridge on the Charles 
scottariel@hsl.harvard.edu

Dee Dee Chen
Director of Professional Staff Compensation and Benefits
Massachusetts General Hospital
ddchen@partners.org

Soraya Kanakis
Graduate Student
Harvard University Extension School & MCPHS
hrxsjk@gmail.com

Kerri-Lynne Kellam, MPH
Ambulatory Care Operations Director-Group Practice Manager
Department of Veteran Affairs
kerri_lynnekellam@yahoo.com

Carmen Kenrich
Vice President Business Development
Leaders For Today
ckenrich@leadersfortoday.com

Linda Leung 
Executive Director of Cardiovascular Service Line 
Cape Cod Healthcare 
linda.s.leung@gmail.com

Bhargav Makadia
Graduate Student
Boston University
bhargav@bu.edu

Karen Moore, RN, FACHE
Senior Vice President of Operations & Chief Nursing Officer
Lawrence General Hospital
Karen.Moore@lawrencegeneral.org

Paul Myoung, MHA, CLSSBB, FACHE
Senior Administrative Director
Massachusetts General Hospital
pmyoung@partners.org

Yemisi Oloruntola-Coates, MA, MAMC
Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer
Baystate Health
Yemisi.oloruntola-coates@baystatehealth.org

Alex Schwarzer, MBA, MPH
Division Manager
Children’s Hospital Boston
Alex.schwarzer@childrens.harvard.edu

Basel Tarab, MD
Patient Relations Specialist
Boston Children’s Hospital
tarab@bc.edu

Carla Villacorta
villacorta.c@gmail.com

LGBT Leaders

Joseph Castellana
joecastellana700@gmail.com

Daniel Abeyta
Physician Access Analyst
Steward Health System
Abeyta83@gmail.com

List of Cultural Holidays January – June 2019

May

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month in the United States. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks on the project were Chinese immigrants.

May is Older Americans Month, established in 1963 to honor the legacies and contributions of older Americans and to support them as they enter their next stage of life.

May is Jewish American Heritage Month, which recognizes the diverse contributions of the Jewish people to American culture.

May 1: Beltane, an ancient Celtic festival celebrated on May Day, signifying the beginning of summer.

May 2: National Day of Prayer, a day of observance in the United States when people are asked to “turn to God in prayer and meditation.”

May 2: Yom HaShoah, Israel’s day of remembrance for the approximately 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

May 3: Saints Philip and James, a Roman Rite feast day for the anniversary of the dedication of the church to Saints Phillip and James in Rome.

May 5: Cinco de Mayo, a Mexican holiday commemorating the Mexican army’s 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War (1861-1867). This day celebrates Mexican culture and heritage, including parades and mariachi music performances.

May 5-June 4 (sundown to sundown): Ramadan, an Islamic holiday marked by fasting, praise, prayer and devotion to Islam.

May 8-9 (sundown to sundown): Yom Ha’Atzmaut, national Independence Day in Israel.

May 17: International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia, a global celebration of sexual-orientation and gender diversities.

May 21: World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development, a day set aside by the United Nations as an opportunity to deepen our understanding of the values of cultural diversity and to learn to live together in harmony.

May 23-24 (sundown to sundown): Declaration of the Báb, the day of declaration of the Báb, the forerunner of Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá’í faith.

May 22-23 (sundown to sundown): Lag BaOmer, a Jewish holiday marking the day of hillula of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai.

May 27: Memorial Day in the United States, a federal holiday established to honor military veterans who died in wars fought by American forces.

May 29: Ascension of Bahá'u'lláh, commemorates the ascension of Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá’í faith.

May 30: Ascension of Jesus, celebrated as the ascension of Christ from Earth in the presence of God within most of the Christian faith.

May 31: Laylat al-Qadr, the holiest night of the year for Muslims, is traditionally celebrated on the 27th day of Ramadan. It is known as the Night of Power and commemorates the night that the Quran was first revealed to the prophet Muhammad.

June

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, established to recognize the impact that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender individuals have had on the world. LGBT groups celebrate this special time with pride parades, picnics, parties, memorials for those lost to hate crimes and HIV/AIDS, and other group gatherings. The last Sunday in June is Gay Pride Day.

June 3-4 (sundown to sundown): Eid al-Fitr, the first day of the Islamic month of Shawwal, marking the end of Ramadan. Many Muslims attend communal prayers, listen to a khutuba (sermon), and give Zakat al-Fitr (charity in the form of food) during Eid al-Fitr.

June 8-10 (sundown to sundown): Shavuot, a Jewish holiday that has double significance. It marks the all-important wheat harvest in Israel and commemorates the anniversary of the day when God gave the Torah to the nation of Israel assembled at Mount Sinai.

June 9: Pentecost, the celebration of the giving of the Ten Commandments by God at Mount Sinai.

June 14: Flag Day in the United States, observed to celebrate the history and symbolism of the American flag.

June 15: St. Vladimir Day, a Roman Catholic feast celebrating St. Vladimir.

June 15: Native American Citizenship Day, commemorating the day in 1924 when the U.S. Congress passed legislation recognizing the citizenship of Native Americans.

June 16: Martyrdom of Guru Arjan Dev, observed by members of the Sikh faith. Guru Arjan Dev was the fifth Sikh guru and the first Sikh martyr.

June 16: Trinity Sunday, observed in the Western Christian faith as a feast in honor of the Holy Trinity.

June 19: Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day. It is observed as a public holiday in 14 U.S. states. This celebration honors the day in 1865 when slaves in Texas and Louisiana finally heard they were free, two months after the end of the Civil War. June 19, therefore, became the day of emancipation for thousands of African-Americans.

June 19: New Church Day, according to Christian belief, on this day the Lord called together the 12 disciples who had followed him on earth, instructed them in the Heavenly Doctrine of the New Jerusalem, and sent them out to teach that “the Lord God Jesus Christ reigns, whose kingdom shall be for ages and ages.” This was the beginning of the New Christian Church.

June 20: Corpus Christi, a Catholic holiday celebrating the presence of the body and blood of Christ, in the Eucharist.

June 21: Litha, the summer solstice celebrated by the Wiccans and Pagans. It is the longest day of the year, representing the sun’s “annual retreat.”

June 21: First Nations Day, a day that gives recognition to the indigenous populations affected by colonization in Canada.

June 23: All Saints’ Day, celebrated by many Eastern Christian churches on this day in June, in recognition of all known and unknown saints.

June 28: Sacred Heart of Jesus, the Feast of the Most Sacred Heart is a solemnity in the liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church.

June 29: Feast Day of Saints Peter and Paul, a liturgical feast in honor of the martyrdom in Rome for the apostles St. Peter and St. Paul in Eastern Orthodox Christianity.

Last Sunday in June: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Pride Day in the United States. It celebrates the Stonewall Riots on June 28, 1969.